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   ... / Mecklenburg / Jury Service / What to Expect  Print  Court Picture
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What to Expect
 
  • Juror Experiences (Quotes)
  • The following are comments from actual jurors who have served in Mecklenburg County:

    "I have never been treated with such kindness, patience, and good humor as I have by the Jury Coordinators. Everyone I saw them interact with was treated in the same manner. They made it a pure pleasure to be there. The facility itself is wonderful and immaculate. The building itself was beautiful and spotlessly clean. Everything was provided for. Even the officers at the metal detector were professional and courteous. Please thank everyone for making my day on the jury a great experience I will never forget!"

    "Excellent facilities! Movies, TV, business center, fridge-all great amenities! Also, the website was very informative and let you know what to expect. The orientation was informative and helpful, also. The day was pleasant."

    "I am a nursing mother of a five month old and I was happy and impressed that the courthouse has a lactation room for the jurors. I used it today and was relieved (and happy!) at how nice, comfortable, and clean it is. It was great and I am most appreciative!"

    "My jury service experience was excellent! I wish I could serve on a yearly basis. The staff, facilities, and ease of parking were outstanding. My day spent in the jury assembly room was one of the most relaxing days I have had in a long time. It was like spending the day at a friend's house!"

    "Although it was an inconvenience, it was not a hardship. It was a very valuable experience and every effort to accommodate us was appreciated!"

    "Excellent facilities; courteous personnel; rates along with first class frequent flyers club/suites in major airports. Very convenient, making the day totally painless."

    "Court personnel were informative, courteous, and pleasant! I'm hoping to be called again in two years! Thanks for making my first court experience pleasant."

    "I have enjoyed the whole experience. It was like a retreat. Very relaxing atmosphere."

    "This is my first time serving as a juror. It is a blessing to have this court system in place. When traveling out of the country, we realize how important it is and what a blessing it is to have a trial by a jury of your peers."

  • Juror Orientation
  • Once all jurors scheduled for service have been checked in, they will be given an orientation conducted by the Jury Coordinator. This is followed by a fifteen-minute video designed to educate jurors on the procedures of jury service. It is requested that jurors be patient and pay attention during the orientation and video, which will answer most, if not all, questions they may have. After the video, jurors are administered an oath. Jurors will wait in the Jury Assembly Room until they are called to a courtroom.

    Throughout the day, jurors may be selected randomly to report to either a civil or criminal courtroom. The judge will brief jurors on the case and introduce the lawyers involved. The judge and lawyers will question each juror to determine impartiality by examining past experiences, opinions or biases. Once a jury is selected, another oath will be administered to all impaneled jurors. Jurors not impaneled must report back to the Jury Assembly Room (5450). The trial begins with the opening statements made by the attorneys for both the plaintiff/state and the defendant. The plaintiff/state must always present evidence. The defendant will be given the opportunity to present evidence, but is not required to do so. Closing arguments are made after the presentation of all the evidence. The judge will instruct the jurors on the issues of the case. The jury will then deliberate and announce its verdict.

  • Mecklenburg's Juror Handbook


  • Newsletter for Mecklenburg County Jurors



  • Suggestions for Coping with the Stress of Jury Service


 
 
 
   
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